Band of the Week - Wes Hoffman

Home » Music Reviews » Review - Loss of Signal (Aftermath)

Review - Loss of Signal (Aftermath)

Loss of Signal - Aftermath (Single Review)

Northern Ireland band Loss Of Signal signifies their rage on Aftermath, a single that will prompt the punk rock contingent to take notice. Within their song, rage exudes, and optimism becomes a shattered mess. Although pessimism is clear, this band begins throughout the track to mend broken ties. Under all the technical trickery and the breakneck guitars, the vocals convey a sense of melancholy, a sadness we all seem to know as the world is in transition. It is typical punk rock, a sound many people love and adore.

Loss Of Signal is ready to elevate and take the scene by the scruff of its neck. Their music is universally accessible too. Aftermath takes influence from early Green Day and even Rise Against. Rise Against has become forefathers, a band that have propelled to higher pedestals, shooting for the stars as they pound the scene with heart-pullers and punk rock behemoths.

In their sight is a raging fire which needs to be fueled even further. Loss Of Signal play hard hitting songs not only to surprise and excite but also, they need to do it to feel alive. When listening to Aftermath, the feeling of emotion hits like a hurricane, and when the song halts, a shock prevails. And as a band, they know how to shred, sing, drum and form melodies convincingly, almost seamlessly.

Aftermath bites down into the skin of punk rock leaving a mark, It naturally sounds like a punk rock song taken from a classic album. This may sound audacious, but Aftermath sounds ever so complete with a signature sound already brewing. That abrasive guitar solo dazzles, those engaging vocals interweave seamlessly with every musical foray. It is chaotic in a good way, an honest way, a fashionable way.

With Aftermath, Loss Of Signal doesn’t churn it out for the sake of making waves. They have honed their musicality, their musical muscle, and the single is a statement for what’s unfolding.

Spotify / Facebook / Twitter.

Words by Mark McConville


«   »

Add comment

Comments

There are no comments yet.